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Rare Butterfly Sighting at Bernheim

The beautiful Lace-winged Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes aesculapius) was seen again here at Bernheim Forest.  It is a rare butterfly that lays its eggs on river cane (Arundinaria gigantea), which are found along creeks. Historically large areas of river cane called canebrakes were found throughout the southeast. These canebrakes have declined in the past decades, and many […]

It’s Pawpaw Blooming Time

Asimina triloba, or Pawpaw, are blooming here at Bernheim Forest. Pawpaw is a small shrub that grows in the understory of mesic forest and small woodland openings. It can grow between 10 to 20 feet, or sometimes as high as 30 feet. It blooms in spring from April to May, and will produce fruit in […]

Removing Garlic Mustard, an Invasive Species

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolate) is an invasive species that Bernheim has removes from the Wilson Creek valley and other isolated places. It is native to Europe and is very difficult to get rid of once it establishes itself in an area. It displaces native and desired plants in a short amount of time, and one plant […]

The Trout Lily Project at Bernheim

Yellow Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum) is a beautiful spring flower that blooms along the creeks here at Bernheim Forest. It produces a single flower in early spring, and it can take up to 8 years before individual plants will flower in the forest. Once the lily flowers, its anthers (the part of the stamen that […]

What’s in this Creek Foam?

Every year while working along the creek, I notice foam on the creek surface. I’ve always wondered what causes this, and I worry that it is caused by pollution. Foam in creeks is normally caused when the surface tension of the water is reduced and air is mixed into the water causes bubbles to form. […]

American Woodcocks are Nesting at Bernheim

It’s spring, and that means nesting birds. American Woodcocks have already been found nesting along the Wilson Creek Valley at Bernheim. Females make a shallow depression in leaves and twigs on the ground in young forests. Males do not play any role in the nesting and care of the young. American Woodcocks can lay four […]

A Tale of Two Orchids: Puttyroot and Cranefly

Puttyroot Orchids (Aplectrum hyemale) is a beautiful orchids that develops a single leaf in the fall which persists through the winter until late spring when it begins to flower. It is one of our more common orchids, but by no means does that mean it is abundant. It is found in higher quality habitats and seems […]

Mourning Cloaks Have Returned

With the warmer weather we have been experiencing this week, mourning cloaks and other butterflies have been seen flying around Bernheim Forest. Mourning cloaks are one of many butterfly species that overwinter, or live through the winter, as adults. They are usually one of the first butterflies seen each year, in addition to Question Mark and Comma […]