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Tales from the Bent Twig Trail: Toothsome Toothworts

 The Toothsome Toothworts & Purple Cress Spring wildflowers have begun to bloom on the Bent Twig Trail and elsewhere at Bernheim. The two-leaf toothworts that held their buds in tiny closed fists for days, are now opening. Both the common name for these diminutive members of the mustard family (Brassiceace), and one of the often […]

Tales from the Bent Twig Trail: Making Change

Virginia Pines are agents of change. Like all trees, virginia pines, Pinus virginiana, are alchemists, transforming ingredients such as water, carbon dioxide, and the energy of the sun, into food (carbohydrates) for the planet. But first the energy becomes trunk, root, and leaves, or in this case, needles. During this remarkable transformation the trees release oxygen. […]

Bernheim Offers Certified Interpretive Guide Training

There is still space, and still time, but act soon! The CIG Program The nationally recognized Certified Interpretive Guide (CIG) program is designed for anyone in the interpretive field. Whether you’re a new hire, a professional looking to refresh your skills, or beginning a second career, this course will aid you in improving your presentation […]

Tales from the Bent Twig Trail: Woodcocks

I’m delighted to report that American Woodcocks, Scolopax minor have returned to Bernheim, and are looking for love. Two weeks ago, my sister, Kathy, and I spotted one in the grassy area near the front gate. Last week I saw one on Bent Twig Trail and followed it for a bit into the heavy brush. […]

Vanishing Acts: Appreciating Trees as Harbingers of Spring

  You don’t have to wait for the early wildflowers to carpet the woodlands, or the crocuses and daffodils to bloom in your yard; you only have to watch the tips of some of our native trees to know when spring is well on its way. Red maple, Acer rubrum, provides an early hint, showing red winter buds that […]

Tales from Bent Twig Trail: Water Matters

The ephemeral creek that runs through portions of the Bent Twig Trail is full of water following the recent rains. The presence of water in this creek is often an indication that spring is around the corner.  Although I didn’t hear the wood frogs that are already adding their duck like squawking to some parts […]

Tales from the Bent Twig Trail: More Barking

In my post last week I wrote about several of the trees that you can easily identify on the Bent Twig Trail by their bark.  However, I forgot to include one of the most common on this trail: the Amercian Beech, Fagus grandifolia. Often growing in association with maple trees, our native beech trees have […]

The Bent Twig Trail: Barking in the Woods

Bernheim seems suspended between winter and spring, and the trees along the Bent Twig Trail are holding next year’s  crop of leaves and flowers in tightly clinched winter buds. In a few weeks these buds will start visibly swelling and become star performers in spring’s visual pageantry, promising to open a bit each day in […]